Over By Christmas

New Exhibtion

Over By Christmas

New Exhibtion

Posted April 18th at 10:53am

Many thought World War I would be over in days, surely by Christmas. To many, Christmas was a time of peace and goodwill towards others, the celebration of the Prince of Peace. Each cause was just. God was on their side, but the war was not over by Christmas.

War was romantic. War was colorful flags, spiked helmets and flashing sabers. War was an adventure. Those called to arms would be heroes, defending their homelands and way of life. Over By Christmas: August-December 1914 examines these romantic notions colliding with the harsh realities of war. The exhibit highlights the first five months of the war through specific topics or case studies including: Germany Mobilizes and Germany’s Rush to War, Invasion: Belgium and France and War in the East.

Open from May 3 through March 29, 2015 in Exhibit Hall, Over by Christmas is an inaugural Museum exhibition in observance of the World War I Centennial in conjunction with On the Brink: A Month That Changed the World in Memory Hall. Exhibits are included with Museum admission and free for members.

 

War Fare: Chow Challenge

Wednesday, April 30

War Fare: Chow Challenge

Wednesday, April 30

Posted March 31st at 6:07pm

Celebrity chefs from four of Kansas City’s finest restaurants will compete in War Fare: Chow Challenge, a World War I-themed cooking competition at 5:30 p.m. on Wednesday, April 30 in the J.C. Nichols Auditorium at the National World War I Museum. 
 
Chefs from Affäre, Grünauer, Room 39 and Webster House will compete for the Chow Challenge Cup in an Iron Chef-style event and will provide free samples of World War I-related food. As the chefs display their culinary skills, noted culinary historian Andrea Broomfield will share the food history of World War I and how it not only changed the way we eat today, but should merit a second look for our current dinner tables.
 
Tickets are only $5 for the general public and are free for members of the Museum with RSVP.  
 

On the Brink

New Exhibition

On the Brink

New Exhibition

Posted March 1st at 4:01pm

A hungry teenage assassin and a wrong turn. The two bullets fired on June 28, 1914 outside of Schillers Delicatessen in Sarajevo, the capital of Bosnia-Herzegovina, placed the world “on the brink” and led to a sequence of events that changed the world forever.

On the Brink: A Month That Changed the World examines the underground organizations, diplomatic communications and international newspaper reporting of the assassination and its political aftershock. The exhibition presents the assassination in a manner never seen before and features items from nine different countries involved in World War I.

Open from March 15 - September 14 in Memory Hall, On the Brink: A Month That Changed the World is included with Museum admission and free for members.

 

From the Philippines to Siberia

Recent Donation

From the Philippines to Siberia

Recent Donation

Posted March 25th at 7:45pm

Fighting still raged on the Western Front of Europe in August 1918 when General William S. Graves was ordered to create a force to be sent to Siberia. The U.S. 27th and 31st Infantry Regiments, Field Hospital 4, Ambulance Company 4, Company D of the 53rd Telegraph Battalion and other smaller units were to be equipped “for winter service,” many of them coming from the balmy Philippines to the frozen lands of Siberia. One of the soldiers of the 31st Infantry was Corporal George Andrew Jensen, Company M.
 
With Japanese, Chinese, British Empire and Czech troops, American forces began arriving in Vladivostok after Sept. 1, 1918. Their initial duties included guarding the railways from Bolshevik attacks. President Wilson had established a policy of non-aggression and the Americans in Siberia followed that policy closely, only fighting when provoked. Small-scale but fierce actions resulted in 170 American dead and 50 wounded. American forces were not officially withdrawn until January 1920 with the last detail departing Vladivostok on April 1, 1920.
 
Corporal George Andrew Jensen went into service from Hastings, Neb., on Oct. 13, 1917. He arrived in the Philippines less than a month later and went to Siberia with the 31st Infantry Regiment in 1918. He was wounded in action at Novitskaya on June 22, 1919. He was discharged from the army in November 1919.
 
The recent donation of his service materials from Jensen’s relatives contains a wide variety of materials: his Model 1917 Service coat with the S-AEF shoulder sleeve insignia (Siberia-American Expeditionary Forces) and the red discharge chevron, a trapunto (a decorative quilted design in high relief) souvenir plaque of his service in the Philippines, photographs, postcards, a color illustration on paper of a U.S. soldier in Siberia, leave passes, and 31st Regiment camp newspapers.
 
More than 97-percent of the objects and documents from the Museum’s collection are donated. Learn how you can support the Museum with a donation.

Take a Trip of a Lifetime

Member Events

Take a Trip of a Lifetime

Member Events

Posted March 14th at 1:11pm

2014 Battlefield Tour: 

Please note: limited spots left in the 2014 Gallipoli tour.

“We have traveled a lot and taken many tours; this was one of our best.” 

-Kelton and Marillyn Smith, on the Museum’s 2012 European battlefield tour

Building on the success of its inaugural battlefield tours in 2012 and 2013, the National World War I Museum is offering another exclusive tour for Museum members.

From Aug. 3-13, 2014, journey through the dried-up gullies and quiet beaches of Gallipoli in a comprehensive walking tour that incorporates the initial landings of April 25, 1915, through to the eventual evacuation in January 1916.

All tours are hosted in conjunction with specialist tour operator Battle Honours Ltd in the UK. Space is limited, so reserve your spot today!

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